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Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey by
"Stand by for news." And with that warm introduction, millions of Americans were greeted each and every day by a true and trusted friend. Unfortunately, America lost a good friend this past weekend. Paul Harvey passed away on Saturday, Feb 28, in Phoenix (Arizona) at the age of 90. Many of you are familiar with Paul Harvey. He has been a staple on radio and television throughout small-town America for the last 50+ years. Whether or not you agreed with his often conservative leanings, you likely still remember having listened to his broadcasts when you were growing up. I know I do. For 76 years, Paul Harvey entertained and enlightened us about goings-on in our own backyard...as well as half-way around the world. He told us about things that we needed to know, and then sold us things that he honestly believed we needed to have (my wife disliked his habit of weaving story and advertisement together, but to many listeners that was just part of the package). And, he injected his thoughts and home-spun insight into his daily news broadcasts known as "Paul Harvey News and Comments" - a show that has run on the ABC Radio Network since 1951. The opinions Paul Harvey expressed were frequently old-fashioned, politically and socially conservative, the musings of a trusted grandfather who's seen it all. Frequently, he would add a bit of his own wisdom, interjecting phrases like "Not all that is called progress, is" or "In times like these, it helps to recall that there have always been times like these..." On May 10, 1976, the ABC Radio Network premiered The Rest of the Story as a separate series which provided endless twists, turns, and surprises as Paul Harvey introduced us to the little-known stories behind the better-known stories of famous events and people (few listeners are aware that every Rest of the Story episode was researched and written by his son, Paul Harvey Jr). The Rest of the Story episodes were fun to listen to, and I frequently enjoyed trying to figure out who or what Paul was talking about, and how the story would end. Sometimes I would guess right, more often than not I would be way off. Almost always, though, I was entertained. Over the years, Paul Harvey developed his own amicable style, delivered with a powerful yet warm and friendly speaking voice, and filled with well-timed pauses and clearly annunciated words. Simply put, Paul Harvey was an artist who used his voice in much the same manner as a painter would use canvas and color, creating a picture in our minds as he eloquently described a scene. Paul Harvey was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1919. In 1940, he met and married his wife Lynne Angel (Cooper) Harvey, whom he referred to simply as "Angel." She died in 2007 at the age of 92, after 67 years of marriage. I for one am a little saddened by the passing of Paul Harvey. I had the pleasure of meeting him several years ago, and he struck me as a genuinely warm and caring person. His was a voice that I fondly remember listening to over the years. His death, like so many other people that we have grown up with, brings home the reality that in time we all must go. For today, I leave you with these four words that only a fan can appreciate: "Paul Harvey....good day."
Mar 01, 2009 | 1512 views | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print


Yaargh. At least we can look
by Mark Olson
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 12, 2011 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Yaargh. At least we can look forward to some warmer weather next week.

Remember to "Spring Ahead"
by Greg Boe
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 12, 2011 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Remember to “Spring Ahead” tomorrow! At 2:00 a.m. on Sunday we will loose an hour of sleep here in Minnesota, as we perform that twice-yearly ritual of adjusting our clocks to provide extra daylight for our summer evenings. For most of us, that will mean setting our clocks ahead one hour before we go to bed Saturday night.
While 48 of 50 states do observe Daylight Savings Time, residents of Arizona and Hawaii do not participate.

Remember to "Spring Ahead"
by Greg Boe
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 13, 2010 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Remember to “Spring Ahead” this weekend!
Be sure to set your clocks ahead by one hour when you go to bed Saturday night, or at 2:00 a.m. if you stay up that late. Sunday, March 14, is the day that Americans in 48 of 50 states will adjust their clocks by one hour, in an effort to provide a little extra daylight for their summer evenings.
(Residents of Arizona and Hawaii do not partake in the twice-yearly folly of manipulating the time of their summer sunsets).

Remember to "Spring Ahead"
by Greg Boe
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 03, 2009 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Remember to “Spring Ahead” this weekend. Be sure to set your clocks ahead one hour when you go to bed on Saturday night, or you’ll be late by an hour all day on Sunday!
In case you are wondering why I placed this particular reminder into the “Paul Harvey” discussion forum, I did it because Paul used to always complain about Daylight Savings Time. He would say “Well, Americans, it’s that time of the year once again….time for most of us to blindly march forward toward the cliff like a group of lemmings…setting our clocks forward by one hour, not because it makes any sense to do so but simply because the government has told us that we should.” You see, in his later years Paul and his wife lived in Arizona during the winter – and Arizona is one of a handfull of states that does not observe Daylight Savings Time. I suspect he found that he liked not having to go through that artificial adjustment twice each year, so he began to question the wisdom of doing so. I think that he would have chuckled at having such a reminder placed into “his” final forum here at the Chaska Herald web site!

That was very nice, steinie.
by Greg Boe
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 03, 2009 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

That was very nice, steinie. Thanks for sharing – I enjoyed reading your posting. I feel much the same, because I remember growing up enjoying Paul on the AM radio with my dad and/or grandpa. Then, the AM radio was pushed aside in favor of FM radio (and, yes, even 8-track and later cassettes and/or CDs), and time spent with friends, girlfriends, jobs, college, etc. However, as an adult I found myself being drawn once again to that same familiar voice. There was something comforting about those noon-time visits…it was almost like going home again, if only for a while.
That is part of what I like so much about living in Chaska in fact – that same small-town feel, the hometown values, the smile of a familiar face greeting you in the middle of a hectic day, etc. It’s hard to put your finger on it exactly, but I like how it makes me feel. My wife and children didn’t always share that same appreciation for Paul Harvey that I had developed, but they understood the importance that I placed in those short visits and they allowed me that time. Perhaps it was out of love and/or respect for me…or maybe, just maybe, it was because they came to enjoy those moments as much as I did. I guess it doesn’t matter why. It was a moment that we could all share as we traveled just about anywhere in the USA. Long about 12:00 noon, a quick trip up and down the AM dial would most likely find a station somewhere that was broadcasting that same friendly voice, calling out to us, inviting us to sit down and visit for a spell. It was often a chance to relax for a few minutes in an otherwise busy day. I guess we all need that once in a while.

Paul Harvey's voice and
by steinie
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 02, 2009 | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Paul Harvey’s voice and unique delivery are as fresh in my mind today as they were when I was 8. I am sad to hear of his passing.
Harvey’s broadcasts were a lunch-time staple at the Small Farm where I grew up. A young farmer, my dad didn’t often wear a watch but always knew when it was time to come in for lunch. Sweaty and full of grease from a morning baling hay, he would quickly turn on the old AM radio on the counter to hear the noon farm reports while washing up for lunch. The buzzing of the tin fan in the kitchen created radio static – and the four of us kids (soon to be five)added to the chaos – but everything seemed to stop when Paul Harvey invited us to “stand by for the news.”
I’m not a true farm girl (I still have to ask my husband how many acres my dad farms), but Paul Harvey’s stories and observations both entertained and enlightened me … and my dad. Those broadcasts were something my dad and I could enjoy together, even during difficult times.
Years quickly passed, and I left those lunch-time conversations for sports, summer jobs, boys and college. But sometime in my early 20s, I was searching for new music on my car radio when an old friend invited me to “hear the rest of the story.”
And how ironic that Paul Harvey should find me again on that day – driving to work in my 1988 Plymouth Sundance – when he chose to share with his listeners one of his favorite stories. Others may have heard it before, but I know that it was the first time “So God Made a Farmer” spoke to me.
He didn’t write the words (the author is unknown), but Paul Harvey made me listen. And it was on that day that I finally understood – and appreciated – the life’s work fulfilled by dad, grandpa and brothers.
In July 2003, I gave credit to Paul Harvey for helping me understand our family legacy and shared “So God Made a Farmer” at my grandfather’s funeral.
The tribute ends as follows:
It had to be somebody who’d plow deep and straight and not cut corners. Somebody to seed,weed, feed, breed, brake, disk, plow, plant, strain the milk, replenish the self-feeder and
finish a hard week’s work with and eight mile drive to church. Somebody who’d bale a family together with the soft, strong bonds of sharing, who would laugh, and then sigh, and then reply with smiling eyes when his family says that they are proud of what Dad does.
“So God made a farmer.”
Author Unknown

I also had a soft spot for
by Mark Olson
 in response to Saying goodbye to Paul Harvey
Mar 02, 2009 | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print

I also had a soft spot for Paul Harvey. His phrasing left out normal punctuation and strung unrelated topics together, which kept me lurching along with him.
As your wife probably noticed, that phrasing would always lead to wierd juxopositions with news and advertisements: War has broken out in Somalia for your listening pleasure Boise speakers is tops. The nation continues to fight the recession for all your motor oil needs use Pennzoil Motor Oil.

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